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Art, Disobedience and Ethics, 2018


Atkinson, D (2018) focuses on ‘Rogue Game’ in ‘Art, Disobedience and Ethics: Adventures of Pedagogy’ (Palgrave Macmillan)

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Image, Text, Architecture, 2015


Wilson, R. (2015) front cover and chapter on ‘Was Here’ in ‘Image, Text, Architecture: The Utopics of the Architectural Media’ (London: Ashgate)

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The Practice of Place, 2015


Smith, E. (2015) ‘Rogue Game’ as case study in ‘The Practice of Place’ (London: Architecture Association Bedford Press)


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Play and Participation in Contemporary Art, 2015


Tim Stott writes a chapter on ‘Platform’. An extract:

Platform was an instruction-based game that took as its playground a graticular plan of the city, and as its play object, a generic architectural platform small enough to fit within the palm of a hand and with no marked identity, which had to be held, dropped, positioned, or discarded as close as possible to a grid intersection chosen by the player… The artists made this platform available to players in such a way that it was “open to interpretation and use,” in the understanding that the meeting of urban domain and the field of play would be an abrasive one and not always relaxed, as players, guided by the instructions of the game, necessarily sought out abnormal paths and restricted territories in the city. At the very least, players would face the choice of whether to follow the instructions of the game where doing so would destabilise and even transgress in some way the architectural fabric of the city. Even if they chose to give up the game in the face of some obstacle to their progress, this would make the players vividly aware of the normative and proprietary function of the city’s architecture.’

Tim Stott (2015) ‘Play and Participation in Contemporary Art Practices’ (London: Routledge). ISBN 9781138850286.


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Rogue Game: An Architecture of Transgression, 2014


Can Altay writes an essay on Rogue Game. An extract:

Inhabitation, cohabitation, movement and proximity in the Rogue Game provide ‘tools’ with which the limits of architecture can be revealed and exhausted; as well as prescribing the possibility of ‘an architecture’ that can intervene and contribute to other social processes and urban spaces in similar manners. Space expands through inhabitation and movement, since there is always a “spatial excess” contained within architecture, existing “beyond the relevance for the present, and into the realm of the future” as defined by Elizabeth Grosz (2001). The ways in which we occupy given systems, structures, and spaces are crucial, for any attempt to activate this excess, and to challenge, alter, or transform our given reality. Rogue Game thus suggests ways in which other architectures and urban contexts can be occupied.’

Can Altay (2014) ‘Rogue Game: An Architecture of Transgression’ in Rice, L. & Littlefield, D. (editors) ‘Transgression: Towards an expanded architecture’ published as one of the ‘AHRA Critiques: Critical Studies in Architectural Humanities’ series, (London: Routledge).


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Architectural Design 2013


Jonathan Mosley and Rachel Sara (guest editors) (2013) ‘The Architecture of Transgression’ Architectural Design, (London/New York: Wiley Academy). ISBN 9781118361795


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Art Monthly 2012


Danielle Rose King, ‘Rogue Game’ exhibition and symposium review at Spike Island, Art Monthly, 362: 12/12, p.362.

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A conversation between Emily Pethick, Director of the Showroom and Can Altay, Sophie Warren and Jonathan Mosley, 2011


The conversation and stills from ‘Rogue Game, First Play’ is published within Soon All Your Neighbours Will Be Artists (Birmingham: Eastside Projects, 2011). ISBN 978-19-06753-30-6

Editorial: Soon All Your Neighbours Will Be Artists began in January 2011 as a collaboration between members of the artist-led organisations Aid & Abet, Cambridge; Extra Special People at Eastside Projects, Birmingham; Spike Associates, Bristol; and WARP, Cardiff. Framed by major cuts to public funding to the arts in the UK, the publication aims to present sustainable models for art production. Artists were invited to contribute works that play on the status on ‘survival’ in their practice, and a collection of texts from various sources have been selected to further problematise a single conception of the term.

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El Ahali, 2007


Invited contribution to El Ahali journal edited by Can Altay.

Points of Purchase, Proposition No. 18  and Rogue Game, Proposition No. 17

Exhibited:

2007-9  Spike Island, Bristol, Kunsterhaus Bethanien, Berlin, ‘Social Diagrams: Planning Reconsidered’ exhibition Kunsterhaus, Stuttgart and ‘Publish and Be Dammed’ Self-Publishing Fair, London


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Critical Architecture, 2007


Robin Wilson, ‘Image, Text, Architecture: the presence that WAS HERE’ chapter on the work of Jonathan Mosley and Sophie Warren, published in Jane Rendell et al. (ed) Critical Architecture, (London: Routledge, 2007), pp. 130-134. ISBN 978-0-415-41538-5

Publishers summary: ‘Critical Architecture examines the relationship between critical practice in architecture and architectural criticism. Placing architecture in an interdisciplinary context, the book explores architectural criticism with reference to modes of criticism in other disciplines – specifically art criticism – and considers how critical practice in architecture operates through a number of different modes: buildings, drawings and texts.’

Robin Wilson writes a chapter within the publication focussing on our interventional work ‘Was Here’ in relation to a house design as reported in the architectural press with the work ‘Understanding the Measure of Things’.

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Surface Tension Supplement No.1, 2006


Sophie Warren and Jonathan Mosley, commissioned image work ‘Proposed Alterations to a City Plan’ 2006, pp 10-11

and

Robin Wilson, ‘Blue Sky Thinking: A Utopia in Bristol’, in Brandon LaBelle (ed) Surface Tension Journal, no. 1 (Los Angeles/Berlin: Errant Bodies Publications, 2006), pp. 2-12. ISBN: 978-0-9772594-0-3.

Reviewing our situation specific work and solo exhibition ‘Model (Blue Sky Thinking)’ Robin Wilson explores its relation to the context of the exhibition within an area of impending development and in relation to our wider practice.

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Art and Architecture Journal, 2002


Robin Wilson, ‘Bristol – Process and Memory’, in Next Generation supplement to Art and Architecture journal, 2002, pp. 4-5. The article reviews our presentation for an event title ‘Next Generation’.

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Architects Journal, 2002


A practice review focussing on the process and realisation of a house design in relation to the M5 Southbound body of work. The six page article developed our collaboration with writer on art and architecture Robin Wilson. The front cover to the magazine was an intervention into architectural reportage.

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